Applique

Applique is a craft technique that involves adorning a base fabric with small patterned fabric pieces. It is ornamental needlework in which pieces of fabric in different shapes and patterns are sewn or stuck onto a larger piece to form a picture or pattern. It is commonly used as decoration, commonly practised with textiles.

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    Hand Embroidery

    Embroidery is the craft of embellishing a textile or other material with needle and thread using motifs, which are usually geometrical, floral or inspired by nature. Designs in Indian embroidery are formed on the basis of the texture and the design of the fabric and the stitch. The dot and the alternate dot, the circle, the square, the triangle, and permutations and combinations of these constitute the design.

  • Handloom

    Handlooms are fundamentally different from power looms. Motion of the handloom is operated by skilful human hands, without using any source of energy like electricity, water, air or sun to drive the motion of the loom. Handloom fabric is woven on a frame loom, keeping in mind the layout and placement of stripes that is carefully designed in advance. Today Indian hand weavers offer vast range of decorative and furnishing fabrics for homes in cotton and silk. They have become global style statements.

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    Tie and Dye

    The process of tie-dye typically consists of folding, twisting, pleating, or crumpling fabric or a garment, binding it with string or rubber bands, and finally applying dyes. Tie and dye is one of the most widely accepted and one of the very traditional methods of printing textiles in India. According to the design and the motif, each pattern has its special significance.

  • Block Printing

    Block printing is an ancient textile tradition that originated in the Rajasthan Desert region of India centuries ago. It is the process of printing patterns on textiles, usually of linen, cotton or silk, by means of incised wooden blocks. It is capable of yielding highly artistic results, some of which are unobtainable by any other method. Block printing is a labour-intensive, painstaking process which requires time, teamwork and a tremendous level of skill.

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    Dabu Printing

    The dabu mud is made from locally available black clay, spoiled wheat flour, calcium and limestone. The mud is filtered by foot through a net in order to strain out rocks and inerals – leaving a thick, smooth mud paste. The process is often compared to the way grapes are crushed to make wine. Although this is a type of woodblock printing itself but the blocks to print dabu are distinctly different, with deeper grooves for mud, and wider lines compared to blocks for the traditional Bagru print. After the mud is made, it is ready to be printed. The printer dips the block in the mud and stamps it on the fabric.

  • Screen Printing

    Screen printing was previously known as silk screening which refers to the printing technique that utilizes a stencil or a porous fabric to create a sharp edged image. Nowadays it is very popular both in fields of commercial printing and fine arts. Because of its advantage of low cost and ability to print on many mediums it is preferred over other processes like dye sublimation or inkjet printing. It started off during the First World War as an industrial process used primarily for printing flags and banners. The greatest advantage of screen printing is that it possesses more versatility than any other traditional printing techniques.

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    Danka Work

    Daane ka kaam is an unusual and a unique textile surface ornamentation technique that is practiced in Udaipur, in the Mewar region of Rajasthan. Using small diamond concave relief shaped cut pieces of sheet metals, such as real gold, silver or plated metals, that are hand stitched on to fabrics with zari yarn, it is complimented by zardozi embroidery that is work around it.

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